Disabled Athlete Told She Can’t Bring Service Dog Into TriBeCa Deli

Updated January 31, 2013 7:03am

Reposted from a story published on January 31, 2013 7:03am | By Ben Fractenberg, DNAinfo Reporter/Producer

deli fucks up

TRIBECA — Disabled athlete Helene Hines defied medical experts by running dozens of marathons despite being told she couldn’t walk, yet one of her biggest challenges is something much less grueling — buying a turkey sandwich in a TriBeCa deli.

The 65-year-old, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis 35 years ago, went into the store with her service dog, a black lab named Charlie, to grab lunch Wednesday.

Instead, she was hit by a tirade from workers at the TriBeCa Deli at 368 Greenwich St. who yelled at her to get out.

“The guys started yelling, “Get out! Get out!” said Hines of two cashiers who confronted her when she walked in.

“They said there’s food in there [and they] cannot have hair from the dog.”

Hines, a Long Islander who advocates for people with disabilities and once ran alongside President Bill Clinton to celebrate the Americans with Disabilities Act, said she tried to reason with the workers.

She offered to show them papers for Charlie, who wears a bright red vest with the words “service animal” written on it, but they would not look at them.

“I’m not going anywhere. Give me my sandwich,” she said she finally demanded, telling the workers she was going to call 911.

Hines got her sandwich, walked outside and called the police.

“The squad car came and they went inside and told the guys the law,” she said.

Hines — who has run 27 marathons and taken part in about another 20 with a hand-cranked wheelchair, winning the women’s handcycle division in the 2010 New York City marathon — said she intends to file a civil lawsuit against the deli. 

An assistant manager confirmed workers told Hines she couldn’t bring Charlie inside,  based on concerns he would contaminate the food.

“The cashier told her you’re not supposed to bring the dog inside,” he said over the phone Wednesday. “The place was busy.”

The assistant manager, who declined to give his name, downplayed the incident, saying Hines got the sandwich she ordered. He added that the police came in and briefly talked with the workers.

Even after being informed of the rules by police, the assistant manager still appeared to be in the dark about the law — in what advocates say is just one example of chronic ignorance about service animals in local businesses.

The city’s Health Department has made the law very clear,  issuing a memo last year notifying businesses that they are violating city, state and federal rules if they bar disabled people with service dogs from entering.

“It is deemed discriminatory and, therefore, unlawful to deny a person access to a place of public accommodation, such as a restaurant or other food service establishment, solely because that person has a disability and is accompanied by a guide dog, hearing dog or service dog,” city officials wrote in the May 2012 memo.

Business owners are also not allowed to demand paperwork showing that a dog is a service animal or that a person is disabled, officials said.

“A person with a disability accompanied by a service dog is not required by law to show proof or confirmation to you that they have a disability or that the animal accompanying him or her was trained to be a service animal,” the city said.

Hines is a well-known and outspoken disabilities advocate who was told more than 30 years ago that she would never walk again, and used her determination as fuel to not only walk but run marathons.

She is an active member of Achilles International, which unites able-bodied and disabled runners, and won first place in the women’s hand-crank wheelchair division of the group’s first marathon in 2001. A longtime physical education instructor, she has also worked with disabled athletes on swimming and handcycling, and she recently published a memoir.

On Wednesday afternoon, Hines had stopped in the deli while waiting for her daughter — who suffers from a neurological disorder and also uses a service dog — to finish a doctor’s appointment nearby.

When the situation at the deli was finally resolved, Hines headed back to the doctor’s office on Hudson Street, only to find out her opera singer daughter, Jennifer Hines, 40, had just gone through a similar ordeal.

When Jennifer walked into the office, the receptionist told her she couldn’t bring her dog inside. 

“She’s humiliated,” Helene Hines said. “It’s just not nice.”

Her daughter was on the verge of leaving when the doctor finally came out to intervene.

“It’s a very frustrating thing,” Hines said. “You’d think in this day and age people would understand and be more compassionate.”

It’s nice to know stupid people are gainfully employed

Well Obama got  re-elected Romney  is back under a rock hand washing his magic underwear and stupid abusive people still have jobs ,Ah all is well in the universe…..unless you’re disabled with a service dog.

As most of you know every Sunday Ella and I go to visit poppa to spend some quality time with him and help with any paperwork he has.

Every time we go there we go to Walgreens afterwards to pick up anything medical we might need. Since July when I got Zeus My service dog he has been accompanying me, well today as we entered Zeus was being the poster boy for service dog good behavior.

zeus1

I no sooner entered the store than a woman wearing traditional Muslim headdress blocked the aisle and pointed to Zeus, she said” take it out”; I said beg your pardon she replied “everyone knows dogs can’t come in”. I replied he’s a service dog, she replied “I don’t care what breed he is get him out” I laughed she replied “you won’t be laughing if we call animal control”.

Now Zeus is wearing a glow in the dark bright red harness with black trim and 2 inch high white letters SERVICE DOG.

zeus's new vest

(the one above is from the sales catalogue thus the different name but it is the model zeus wears)

I said excuse me maam but before you break any more laws go speak to your manager and ask him what a service dog is and then you can apologize. she called me an idiot and said the dog had to go, I left her presence and found the front of the store and asked for the manager, I was directed to a large Pakistani man who when asked   said “yes I’m the manager” until I told him about her obnoxious behavior then he retracted and said  he wasn’t the manager then while staring straight at Zeus he said “maybe it’s not obvious that he’s a service dog”.

this is the same store that 6 months ago a woman walked on me and my chair and then said my damn chair was a nuisance?

http://disabledaccessdenied.wordpress.com/2012/05/19/walgreens-store-on-kissena-boulevard-and-45st-in-flushing-new-york-thinks-the-abuse-of-the-disabled-is-funny/

This is a pharmacy people don’t come for hardware or pizza, or fine wine. Except for a few variety goods they come for medical aids for prescriptions, for bandages and for medical help. So with that in mind would it not serve to employ people who have the most basic knowledge of that service industry, and at least inform them about laws regarding service animals and the laws pertaining to disabled access as per the Americans with disabilities act?.

I have been in this store every week for 6 months and again and again they employ people that cannot even speak English and they employ people who are homophobic. They employ people who because of their strict religion feel it is their right to preach to me, and they employ stupid people that even when presented with federal photo id and an explanation of the act that allows service animalson their premises, they still are rude abusive and obnoxious.

This is not a racist rant, I choose to live in the heavily Pakistani-Bengali- Korean and Chinese and Russian neighborhood, because I love the people the cuisine the faith and the atmosphere, that doesn’t give free license to the fringe hardcore element to run roughshod forcing their hatred and fears onto others. To the management of this Walgreens it seems they are the catchment at the bottom of the local drain, where all the extremists fall to, but if you want our money it doesn’t mean we have to be insulted threatened abused and preached to. Asalam- Alaikum

War vets find solace in four-legged friends

Reposted from a story By Eliott C. McLaughlin, CNN
updated 8:36 AM EST, Mon November 12, 2012–>
Many U.S. veterans are struggling with invisible wounds such as post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression. But some of them are finding peace at home thanks to their canine companions. Click through the gallery to meet a few veterans and the service dogs who help them get through their daily lives. Many U.S. veterans are struggling with invisible wounds such as post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression. But some of them are finding peace at home thanks to their canine companions. Click through the gallery to meet a few veterans and the service dogs who help them get through their daily lives.//
Lobo helps Jeff Wilson keep cool in public places. Wilson doesn't like being startled, so with a simple "watch my back" command, the border collie-German shepherd mix watches Wilson's 6 o'clock and gives him a little nudge if anyone walks up behind him at the grocery story or other public setting. If Wilson's anxiety kicks in, Lobo will jump and put his paws on Wilson's chest to give him something else to focus on.

Lobo helps Jeff Wilson keep cool in public places. Wilson doesn’t like being startled, so with a simple “watch my back” command, the border collie-German shepherd mix watches Wilson’s 6 o’clock and gives him a little nudge if anyone walks up behind him at the grocery story or other public setting. If Wilson’s anxiety kicks in, Lobo will jump and put his paws on Wilson’s chest to give him something else to focus on.//

Before she met Vito, Ana Sarver would average about two hours of sleep a night. Like many veterans with PTSD, she would struggle with restlessness, nightmares and hypervigilance. With Vito, "as soon as he feels me restless, he wakes up and he wakes me up and brings me out of it. ... He keeps me from getting up in the middle of the night and pacing every which way." Vito also gives Sarver the ability to function during the day. With the dog at her side, Sarver feels more comfortable in social settings such as restaurants. Before she met Vito, Ana Sarver would average about two hours of sleep a night. Like many veterans with PTSD, she would struggle with restlessness, nightmares and hypervigilance. With Vito, “as soon as he feels me restless, he wakes up and he wakes me up and brings me out of it. … He keeps me from getting up in the middle of the night and pacing every which way.” Vito also gives Sarver the ability to function during the day. With the dog at her side, Sarver feels more comfortable in social settings such as restaurants.//
David Angel<strong> </strong>Leos returned from his second tour in Iraq and found his life falling apart: "I was drinking, family life was really tough. Nightmares, constantly. Flashbacks." He had lost many of his close friends in the war, and he was struggling with extreme PTSD. But after being matched up with Shadow, he has been able to find some peace. "Having him is like having a battle buddy with you, somebody who is going to watch your back -- knowing if you don't see it, he will." David AngelLeos returned from his second tour in Iraq and found his life falling apart: “I was drinking, family life was really tough. Nightmares, constantly. Flashbacks.” He had lost many of his close friends in the war, and he was struggling with extreme PTSD. But after being matched up with Shadow, he has been able to find some peace. “Having him is like having a battle buddy with you, somebody who is going to watch your back — knowing if you don’t see it, he will.”//
A trip to the grocery store used to send James McQuoid into a panic. When the Iraq War veteran heard a child crying, he remembered kids screaming in Falluja. Coins jingling in the register reminded him of ammunition carried around a soldier's neck. But Iggie calms McQuoid in public places, creating space between McQuoid and others. He also wakes McQuoid from nightmares and keeps his overall anxiety level down. "Without Iggie, I would still be in my house ... probably divorced from my wife and very estranged from my son," McQuoid said.

A trip to the grocery store used to send James McQuoid into a panic. When the Iraq War veteran heard a child crying, he remembered kids screaming in Falluja. Coins jingling in the register reminded him of ammunition carried around a soldier’s neck. But Iggie calms McQuoid in public places, creating space between McQuoid and others. He also wakes McQuoid from nightmares and keeps his overall anxiety level down. “Without Iggie, I would still be in my house … probably divorced from my wife and very estranged from my son,” McQuoid said.//

When Jeremiah Gaches came back to the United States, he isolated himself a lot. But after he met Rocky, Gaches found it much easier to get out of the house. Rocky watches Gaches' surroundings so the veteran doesn't always have to be at high alert, and if Gaches is feeling uncomfortable, Rocky will calm him down. Now, Gaches said, he's comfortable talking to people in public, and he's helping to train other veterans and their service dogs. When Jeremiah Gaches came back to the United States, he isolated himself a lot. But after he met Rocky, Gaches found it much easier to get out of the house. Rocky watches Gaches’ surroundings so the veteran doesn’t always have to be at high alert, and if Gaches is feeling uncomfortable, Rocky will calm him down. Now, Gaches said, he’s comfortable talking to people in public, and he’s helping to train other veterans and their service dogs.//
Shadow is the only reason Jennifer Haeffner goes out in public these days. Before she and the Labrador-Burmese mountain dog teamed up, she essentially had been housebound for five years, considering herself lucky if she got out once a month for grocery shopping. Now, she and Shadow go out several times a week, and he wakes her up from nightmares and picks things up so she doesn't stress her bad back and hips.

Shadow is the only reason Jennifer Haeffner goes out in public these days. Before she and the Labrador-Burmese mountain dog teamed up, she essentially had been housebound for five years, considering herself lucky if she got out once a month for grocery shopping. Now, she and Shadow go out several times a week, and he wakes her up from nightmares and picks things up so she doesn’t stress her bad back and hips.//

When Nick Udall returned from Vietnam, he found it very difficult to be in a crowd. He was always on alert, looking for exit strategies "if something happens." Annie is vigilant so he doesn't always have to be. She also helps remind him to take his medicine, running up to his chest and sticking her nose in his face. "I take anti-anxiety medicine, but I get the same effect by holding her," he said. "The reason I hold her up here like this is as soon as I do just -- whoosh -- I can feel the stress go away. It's amazing." When Nick Udall returned from Vietnam, he found it very difficult to be in a crowd. He was always on alert, looking for exit strategies “if something happens.” Annie is vigilant so he doesn’t always have to be. She also helps remind him to take his medicine, running up to his chest and sticking her nose in his face. “I take anti-anxiety medicine, but I get the same effect by holding her,” he said. “The reason I hold her up here like this is as soon as I do just — whoosh — I can feel the stress go away. It’s amazing.”//
 

(CNN) — He was antisocial and difficult to work with at first. He’d clearly been abused by his father as evidenced by the deep, round scab near his shoulder. He hadn’t been eating well.

And he was so skittish that the slightest noise or motion set him off. But Army veteran Jeff Wilson needed a new dog, and this pound puppy — a border collie-German shepherd mix — was it.

He named him Lobo, and it wasn’t long before Wilson, 44, realized they had the same issues.

“We were kind of kindred spirits,” he said. “I think it really helped deepen our connection because he wasn’t just helping me; I was helping him. I was helping him get past the same obstacles that I had. I had to recognize it in myself and get past that to help him.”

Wilson is a former tank commander and flight engineer who isn’t at liberty to speak about his time in Iraq other than to say he manned a machine gun while hanging out of the door of a helicopter. He can also say that he was often “exposed to very dangerous situations” during his 14 years in the service.

He has been diagnosed with depression and anxiety from post-traumatic stress disorder, and he’s not alone. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, 11% to 20% of Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans are suffering from PTSD.

Wilson said his depression turned him into a hermit. He would “curl up and not talk to anybody,” and his anxiety made it difficult to go into public.

If he did leave the house, he was hypervigilant. If someone walked up behind him or dropped something that emitted a clatter, it triggered the “fight or flight” mechanism he’d groomed in the military.

The anxiety was so bad that before he was diagnosed with PTSD, he went to the emergency room four times because he thought he was having a heart attack. He “self-medicated” so heavily with booze that it strained the relationship between him and his now-wife of two years.

“I was having to drink to numb all my senses and be quasi-normal,” he said.

But today, with Lobo by his side, Wilson is finding it easier to cope.

The two have been working with Operation Freedom Paws, a nonprofit in Gilroy, California, that helps veterans train their own service dogs. It is run by Mary Cortani, a veteran and one of the top 10 CNN Heroes of 2012.

When veterans train “their own service dog, there are immediate benefits right off the bat,” Cortani said. “They have a mission and a purpose again. It gives them something to focus on and to complete. It gives them a sense of security and safety. … They know they’re not alone. They’ve always got their buddy at the end of the leash.”

Now Wilson tells Lobo, “Watch my back,” and his four-legged friend stands behind him and gives him a nudge if anyone approaches. When something stokes Wilson’s anxiety, Lobo senses it, jumps up and puts his paws on Wilson’s chest so he can redirect his focus.

“Knowing he’s there makes me comfortable,” Wilson said. “I’m not worried about the attacks. I still think about them, but I’m not hampered by them. I can go to the movies.”

A study on hold

The Veterans Affairs Department recently put a study on hold that would determine the effectiveness of canine therapy for troops suffering from PTSD. Until that study is complete, the VA will continue providing dogs for a variety of ailments, but not PTSD.

Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Georgia, co-sponsored the 2009 legislation that kicked off the study. He was inspired by the strides that dogs helped his mother make from 1995 to 1998 after she was stricken with Alzheimer’s.

“She wasn’t very fond of dogs at all, but when she developed Alzheimer’s, they became a key part of her therapy,” the senator said. “She was unable to really communicate at that time, but you could easily tell, emotionally, the calming effect the service dogs had.”

Watch this video

 
Watch this video

Gen. Chiarelli on treating PTSD and TB

Watch this video

Service dogs help war veterans recover

Dogs: A medicine for mental health problems?

Isakson said the VA is rewriting the parameters of the study to take into account the dogs’ temperaments and the importance of matching the trainers, not just the dogs, with the patients.

Yet not everyone is convinced “the VA has the right stuff” to conduct the necessary experiments, said Corey Hudson, CEO of Canine Companions for Independence and president of the North American chapter of the umbrella organization, Assistance Dogs International.

Hudson said he hopes the study will be large enough to consider the broad gamut of symptoms associated with PTSD, as well as the anecdotal evidence suggesting canine companions can help tug the disorder’s sufferers from their shells.

“There’s something mystical and magical about dogs and people and placing them together,” said Hudson, who has “worked with and against the VA” during his 22 years of experience with assistance dogs. Canine Companions for Independence has more than 900 puppy raisers and works to pair veterans with dogs regardless of whether the VA shells out for it.

Hudson doesn’t cite scientific studies, such as the one that says canine interaction increases a human’s level of oxytocin, a hormone that reduces anxiety and blood pressure.

Instead, he speaks about how dogs love unconditionally and don’t judge. He explains how they naturally spark social interaction — “Cool dog; can I pet her?” — and how ownership precludes people from locking themselves in their homes, away from society.

“You can also use them as an excuse to get out of things or leave early,” Hudson said.

Case in point

Shadow is one pooch accustomed to being used for such occasions.

The 2-year-old Labrador-Bernese mountain dog mix is the inseparable pal of Jennifer Haeffner, a seven-year Army veteran who had been housebound for about five years before meeting Shadow in the summer.

“He’s a very active dog. It makes me do things. I don’t have the option of hiding in the house. I have to go out,” said the 41-year-old Ripon, California, resident.

During Operation Desert Storm, where she served for about nine months between 1991 and 1992, she was sexually assaulted on multiple occasions by other service members, she said. It’s a fairly common occurrence that befalls about one in four women in the military, according to the VA.

He’s a very active dog. … I don’t have the option of hiding in the house. I have to go out.
Jennifer Haeffner, on her dog, Shadow

It left her feeling alone in the world. She wanted to disappear. She forgot how to deal with people and eventually became a recluse, considering it a “good month” if she got out just once to shop for groceries.

She didn’t attend any of her large family’s gatherings. Too many people and too much noise, she said. It terrified her.

“For years after that, I would go out and wander the streets late at night, just hoping someone would kill me because I wasn’t brave enough to kill myself,” she said.

About five months ago, her therapist recommended that she meet Cortani.

Cortani recalls Haeffner wouldn’t look her in the eye when they met. Her leg bounced when she spoke, and she pressed her fingernails into her arm. Her boyfriend was constantly by her side.

“You could just tell the pain and the anguish that even meeting me for the first time was causing,” said Cortani, an Army veteran herself.

Operation Freedom Paws teaches participants to train their own dogs, to customize their behavior. First, the dogs learn to sit, then heel — the basic stuff.

Shadow now knows how to pick things up for Haeffner so she doesn’t put stress on her bad back and hips. He acts as a barrier, physically putting himself between her and any new people she meets.

When she wakes up feeling gloomy, he lets her stay in bed and pet him until she’s ready to face the day. If she hears a sound during the night, he stays by her side as she checks it out, and Shadow is quick to snap her out of nightmares.

“He’ll breathe on me or lay his head across mine to wake me up,” she said of her 55-pound companion. “If I’m in a bad mood, he’ll come over and insist I play with his toy or lay his lead in my lap or lick my feet — cheer me up.”

Cortani said the difference between the Haeffner of five months ago and the Haeffner of today is like “night and day.”

She builds friendships. She’s been to the aquarium. She’s gone horseback riding. She goes places without her boyfriend.

“She’s creating her own new normal,” Cortani said.

Added Haeffner: “I’m much better now. I’m happier.”

K-9 POLICE OFFICER HAS HOME INSURANCE CANCELLED BECAUSE POLICE DOG LIVES AT HOME

Insurer cancels deputy’s homeowner policy; police dog at home deemed too risky

Photograph courtesy of JEFF BEIERMANN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Diezel

Douglas County Sheriff’s Deputy Andy Woodward, with Diezel, a Belgian Malinois. Woodward recently had his homeowners insurance canceled.
Posted: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 7:55 am | Updated: 4:04 pm, Thu Oct 25, 2012.

Insurer cancels deputy’s homeowner policy; police dog at home deemed too risky By Christopher Burbach WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER Kearney Hub | 0 comments

A national insurance company is canceling a local K-9 officer’s homeowners insurance — because he keeps a police dog in his home.

In what appears to be a local first and a national rarity, American Family Insurance told Douglas County Sheriff’s Deputy Andy Woodward last week that his insurance would be terminated in December. The company apparently was not swayed by arguments that the county insures the dog and that Woodward is required to live with it.

The issue arose after an insurance company worker, while conducting an on-site review of the deputy’s home, spotted Woodward’s marked K-9 cruiser in the driveway. American Family subsequently learned that Diezel, the deputy’s Belgian Malinois canine partner, lives at the house.

American Family notified Woodward by letter Oct. 15 that his homeowners insurance coverage would be terminated.

“Due to the additional liability exposure of your police dog, we are unable to continue your homeowner coverage,” the letter said.

Diezel is insured by Douglas County. Woodward, like his fellow K-9 officers, is required to keep his dog at home.

The company gave Woodward time to procure insurance from another company, which he has done. But that doesn’t make it all right with him, and the matter raised concern among law enforcement union leaders in Douglas County and Omaha.

“This is infuriating that I’m getting dropped because of my profession,” said Woodward, 36, who has been a deputy for eight years. He said the company’s decision amounted to bias against his profession.

“He’s my dog,” Woodward said. “He has to go home with me.”

The dog is well-trained — including daily training with Woodward at home and a full day of training with the deputy each week, Woodward said. The two have state and national certifications. Diezel is restrained in a large kennel with high fences and a concrete pad, Woodward said.

Jim Maguire, president of the deputies’ union, the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 2, said he had never heard of an insurance company dropping a K-9 officer because of his dog. Maguire plans to inform union members about the matter.

He and Sgt. John Wells, president of the Omaha police union, expressed concern that it might set a precedent.

“This just doesn’t seem right, for a company this size, to do this over a police dog,” Maguire said.

Added Wells, “Today, it’s a K-9 guy. Tomorrow, is it a SWAT guy because he has a high-powered rifle? … It’s a very unfair decision that seems solely based on his occupation.”

An American Family spokesman, Steve Witmer, said the company has nothing against law enforcement officers. The decision was based on the dog, not its owner’s occupation, Witmer said.

“It’s a big issue. Dog bites, or dog attacks, are the largest single cause of homeowners’ claims since the 1990s,” he said.

American Family has underwriting guidelines that restrict certain breeds of dogs, as well as trained guard or attack dogs, Witmer said. Woodward’s dog doesn’t fit the former category. The company’s prohibited breeds are Akitas, American pit bull terriers, Chows, Rott-weilers and wolf mixes, Witmer said.

But, to American Family, the deputy’s dog fit the latter.

Witmer said someone from American Family asked Woodward, “What would happen if somebody wandered into your yard?” and Woodward replied that the dog would attack.

Woodward said no such conversation occurred.

Witmer confirmed that Woodward told the company that Douglas County covers the dog. He said there was discussion of the county certifying in writing that it has liability coverage of the dog. Witmer said he isn’t sure what happened in that regard.

Normally, such certification would resolve any problem with a K-9 officer’s homeowners insurance, said Terry Fleck, a nationally known canine legal expert based in Nevada.

He called the insurance company’s action ludicrous.

“In 30 years of doing this, I’ve heard of this happening once, in Florida, and it got resolved immediately,” Fleck said. “It’s the owner of the dog who’s always held liable for the actions of the dog.”

The owner is the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office.

The Belgian Malinois, a type of shepherd dog that is increasingly popular as a military and police dog, can be dangerous to bad actors when on duty. It has been widely reported that Cairo, the canine member of Navy SEAL Team Six on its mission to kill Osama bin Laden, was a Belgian Malinois. Diezel is a dual-purpose dog, working on patrol and narcotics detection. There have been no problems with him.

Mark Langan, director of field operations for the Nebraska Humane Society and a former longtime narcotics officer, said he had never heard of an attack locally by a Belgian Malinois or of an unprovoked attack by a police dog on a person.

For his part, Woodward said the insurance company asked if the county would sign a letter verifying that it provides liability insurance for Diezel, and he said the county would.

“I was told that they were going to send a letter and have the county sign it,” Woodward said.

Instead, he said, another letter arrived — a cancellation notice

North Carolina service dog calls 911 to save injured owner

Friday, October 26, 2012

 

NORTH CAROLINA (WABC) — A dependable dog in North Carolina dialed 911 for when her owner fell and couldn’t get up.

Spirit is half Golden Retriever and 100 percent hero.

Dorothy Davidson has had the pooch since she was just a puppy.

 Her loyal companion follows everywhere, even picking things up for her.

 When Dorothy fell in the bathroom, Spirit did what she was trained to do, calling for help with a special phone that features a big white button to alert authorities.

“I sent her in to tap help,” Davidson said. “She activated the phone I have for her.”

Dorothy leans on Spirit for both help and companionship. She suffers from primary lateral sclerosis, which is in the same family of disorders as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, but isn’t fatal.

The Florida-based group Dogs for Life trained Spirit how to use the phone.

Mia’s thoughts-  my service dog zeus will also be trained as part of his ongoing training as both aseizure alert and ptsd dog to dial 911 with a special phone. At 8 months of age he already runs to me when a seizure starts, and also when I have fallen out of my chair he alerts immediately and will not leave my side until help comes.

—Zeus, my trainee service dog is an 8 month old “malinois ” Belgian shepherd male.

Emergency list for the disabled incase hurricane sandy hits *please printout and use as a check list*

When there are emergency services banging on your door at three in the morning yelling “you have to leave” most grab their wallet their purse and pull on clothes and go, not so If you’re disabled.

If you’re disable otherwise abled or just no longer able to care for yourself, or in a wheelchair for any reason you have to plan ahead.

1/ have an emergency person who has promised to call and come round if phones are down, or tell emergency services you need help if they do not hear from you by a certain time.

2/ Make sure you have spares for your chair and a repair kit, you never know when you’ll be allowed back home. I.E. spare tubes, tires, tools to change a flat and a hand pump and also a box of garbage bags so you can cover your upholstery if you have to go out in the weather.

3/ Until the emergency passes keep all your meds and refills and a list of doctors names  addresses , numbers and email addresses in your hand bag. If like me your life is on your laptop every night until the all clear is called pack it in a bag inside two plastic bags, and put all your credit cards and money and purses and important documents in a bag.

4/ If you have a medic alert bracelet or necklace wear it! If you don’t have one write your diagnosis on a card and put it in a plastic holder like the MTA cards go in and attach it to a key ribbon you can wear, and  include anything you’re allergic to.

5/Tell neighbors on your floor you’re home alone, and ask they check on you.

6/ If the storm does hit tape paper to your door, and write in large letters” IN CASE OF EVACUATION A  DSABLED PERSON  LIVES HERE  if you’re deaf or blind include that on the sign.

7/ If you have pets make sure you have a carrier, MOST important if you have a service dog  make sure when you go to bed each night you leave him in his vest and leash ready to go and include some baggies and small containers of food for him.

8/ Put a box in an open place where you could find it in the dark fill it with candles, matches ,batteries  place bottled water next to it and any bandages and first aid kits place them in the middle of the dining room table. Also things like can openers pens and  paper a torch with extra batteries and your wet weather gear and a change of clothes and socks all in the one place and a list of every relative and friends number.

Most Of all even if you’re like me and won’t let anyone touch your chair or push or help, please get over it you must be compliant these people are busy and you’re not the only rescue they’ll be handling time is of the essence.

LASTLY in case you live in a secluded area where help might not be coming, map out your escape route or find a safe place in your house and if it’s somewhere not obvious again stick a note on your door.

If you can’t get out but you need to, email me at disabledaccessdenied@gmail.com  if you can still go online go to my blog www.disabledaccessdenied.com  for a list of emergency contact information in your area.

                                            Please print this out and use it as a check sheet

Service dogs sometimes can help just by giving love

Service dogs as a rule take a couple of years to be correctly trained and my baby boy zeus is no different that is if your talking about the over a hundred official duties he must master. There are however many wonderful curative things they can do naturally at least my Zeus can. Zeus is in training to be a seizure assistance dog and also to help with my PTSD and to make my life in a wheelchair easier. Zeus is six and a half months old and has been training for about six weeks, but two days after I got him when he weighed just eight pounds and was barely eight inches tall I went into full seizure but two seconds before he suddenly sniffed the air started a cacophony of puppy yapping and when I came too he was on my chest whimpering and licking my face . When I have nightmares from PTSD which is most nights,it is not uncommon to awake to find he has got on the bed and has snuggled next to me. When depression hits me and I retire to the sofa, he looks me in the eyes and crawls up beside me and as I come out of the depression I realize I have been stroking his fur for the last hour. So yes I can’t wait till Zeus has been fully trained but I won’t trade the naturally smart loving cuddle monster untrained pup I have right now for a million bucks. If he never did anything else but what he can do right now that would be good enough.As I write this I am getting over the flu and a seriously sprained ankle and he’s asleep on the sofa beside me. Zeus got his name from a loving huge bear of a Rottweiler we adopted in 1999 , he was the love of our lives and like me he was epileptic and he died suddenly from a seizure in2004. When I
Met this dog he made me think of my bear,so he too was named Zeus and on my worst days I think just maybe this pup is his reincarnation.The first Zeus saved our lives twice by pulling down a mugger,then got his reward with a belly rub.This Zeus saves me with his love every day.